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University of Colorado Denver, Denver, CO
Adjunct Faculty, 2015 - present. 
Courses - Architectural Sketching

Architectural Sketching - This studio course explores sketching as a skill, essential to architectural seeing, thinking and designing. Students acquire/improve their technique and skill of sketching both physical and imagined worlds, and improve their perception. This class is taught in the context of architectural thinking and designing. Sketchingis understood as integral to design, and is approached as a central step in the iterative continuum of observing, thinking, creating, testing and documenting. It is the most fluid medium for working out one's own design ideas.
Over the course of the semester students discover or refine their personal sketching style and work towards translating their ideas, thoughts and concepts to paper. They learn how to sketch existing physical objects + buildings on site, how to bring their creative concepts onto paper and how to use different techniques and materials. The class consists of short lectures and demonstrations, class sketching exercises and field sketching exercises. Sketching exercises include a broad range of tasks (sketching lines, surfaces, volumes, mass, spatial composition) in appropriate proportions and scale. Exercises engage existing physical objects/buildings and objects that we imagine, a sequence characteristic of design.

 

Naropa University, Boulder, CO   
Adjunct Faculty, 2013 - present. 
Courses - Sculpture Studio, Figure Drawing, Special Topics: Biomimetic Art

Sculpture Studio - This studio course explores the organizing principles of three-dimensional design as well as the nature of one’s creative thoughts. Students learn to use a variety of materials and techniques including clay, plaster, metals, and conceptual approaches. Investigations into the history of sculptural form raise questions pertinent to contemporary art.

Figure Drawing - The structure of this course is established by centering concentration on the live human figure. Class routine begins with gesture and warm-up drawing, followed by instruction and specific exercises, ending with extended poses or poses relative to a particular figurative study. Figure exercises are derived from an academic tradition to train the eye as well as the hand. 

Special Topics: Biomimetic Art - In this course, students will have an opportunity to intimately apprehend elements of their immediate surroundings, and utilize this new knowledge to develop works of art that are site specific and multi-purposeful. Through in-depth research, students will uncover what nature has to offer - specifically using Biomimicry - to develop concepts for pieces that simulate the intricacies of the natural world. Biomimicry is a discipline that uses imitation of the models, systems, and elements of nature for the purpose of solving complex human problems. We will use the conscious emulation of something in nature (be it animal, vegetal, or plant) to create works that have the potential to: Nourish, replenish or revitalize a depleted natural or urban site; Acknowledge the temporal quality of life in a physically transformational way; Begin a regenerative system in a localized manner; And/or offer a solution to human kind’s parasitic nature.

 

Rocky Mountain College of Art + Design, Denver, CO   
Adjunct Faculty, 2011 - present.
Courses - Senior Design Studio; Biomimetic Art; Sustainable Design Studio; Holistic Design; Portfolio Development; Furniture Design; Restaurant + Retail Studio; Sustainable Design Strategies + Technologies; History of Architecture and Design; Design Principles - Survey of Interior Design; Residential Design Studio

Senior Design Studio - Students enroll in this version of the course to meet the requirements of the Sustainable Design Specialization. Students develop and present a comprehensive design project of individual interest in this course. Emphasis is on the application of research completed in the Design Research course to a project that entails all aspects of skill, knowledge and creative problem solving acquired to date. The project must meet the program’s guidelines and departmental approval. Each student presents and defends the finished project to a jury of professional designers. As part of the Sustainable Design Specialization, coursework must be completed using the sustainable knowledge and strategies obtained to date. Upon successful completion of this course, students will demonstrate the ability to complete a comprehensive design project illustrating all of their skills and knowledge as pre-professionals while taking ownership of their individual vision as designers.
Along with teaching this on campus, I wrote the online content for the course. The culmination of the project included sixteen modules, corresponding assignments and presentation slide design, cited materials, media programming, exercise development and discussion board content.

Biomimetic Art - In this course, students will have an opportunity to intimately apprehend elements of their immediate surroundings, and utilize this new knowledge to develop works of art that are site specific and multi-purposeful. Through in-depth research, students will uncover what nature has to offer - specifically using Biomimicry - to develop concepts for pieces that simulate the intricacies of the natural world. Biomimicry is a discipline that uses imitation of the models, systems, and elements of nature for the purpose of solving complex human problems. We will use the conscious emulation of something in nature to create works that have the potential to: Nourish, replenish or revitalize a depleted natural or urban site; Acknowledge the temporal quality of life in a physically transformational way; Begin a regenerative system in a localized manner; And/or offer a solution to human kind’s parasitic nature.

Sustainable Design Studio - This course is the culmination of the Sustainable Design Area of Specialization and incorporates advanced knowledge of the processes, systems and applications necessary to design a truly sustainable environment. Students analyze and apply evidence-based data to investigate sustainable design in a holistic, systems-thinking context that is conceptualized, interpreted and implemented at varying scales from the building site to structure to interiors. Emphasis is on the articulation and evaluation of new ideas and agendas for a sustainable future, as well as to examine familiar design problems with a new perspective and clear understanding of their environmental impacts using a variety of learning experiences and approaches. As part of the Sustainable Design Area of Specialization, coursework must be completed using the sustainable knowledge and strategies obtained to date. Students who successfully complete this course will have developed a full understanding of sustainability in the context of the built environment; have detailed working knowledge of the appropriate use of sustainable design rating systems; and demonstrate the ability to specify building and interior materials through a portfolio that highlights their sustainable design expertise.
Along with teaching this on campus, I wrote the online content for the course. The culmination of the project included sixteen modules, corresponding assignments and presentation slide design, cited materials, media programming, exercise development and discussion board content.

Holistic Design -  This sophomore-level course provides students with an in-depth understanding and working application of the theoretical principles and issues related to environmental behavior and sustainability as a part of ethical design practice. Emphasis is on industry-specific research methods and problem-solving strategies using conceptual iterations and collaborative charettes to apply design theories within the context of critical solution-based project presentations. As part of the Sustainable Design Specialization, coursework must be completed using the sustainable knowledge and strategies obtained to date. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate their knowledge of human behavioral theory as it applies to a variety of healthy, sustainable, and supportive design types.
Along with teaching this on campus, I wrote the online content for the course. The culmination of the project included sixteen modules, corresponding assignments and presentation slide design, cited materials, media programming, exercise development and discussion board content.

Portfolio Development - This junior-level course provides students with direction and guidance for the development of their interior design portfolio. Emphasis is on the format and presentation of coursework completed to date to create a visual representation of skill development and progression. Students investigate a variety of manual and digital methods to enhance their portfolios and market their abilities. Upon successful completion of this course, students will have a working portfolio that illustrates their individual skills and knowledge of interior design through completed projects in a professional format.
Along with teaching this on campus, I wrote the online content for the course. The culmination of the project included sixteen modules, corresponding assignments and presentation slide design, cited materials, media programming, exercise development and discussion board content.

Furniture Design - Students explore and understand the creative, technical and practical processes involved in the design and construction of custom furniture. Students research and interpret furniture designers and styles, observe the furniture construction process and design custom furniture pieces for specific uses, based on learning exercises, assignments
and charettes. 

Restaurant + Retail Studio - Students will enroll in this version of the course to meet the requirements of the Sustainable Design Specialization. This junior-level course introduces students to the physical, psychological, cultural and social considerations of designing restaurants and retail spaces using collaborative approaches and research methods. Students integrate this knowledge with space planning strategies, brand development, life safety codes and standards, and furniture, finish, and equipment specifications from a design development and presentation perspective. As part of the Sustainable Design Specialization, coursework must be completed using the sustainable knowledge and strategies obtained to date. Upon successful completion of this course, students will have the ability to formulate and communicate a comprehensive design for a restaurant and retail environment based on research integration for human needs.  

Sustainable Design Strategies + Technologies - Requirement for Sustainable Design Area of Specialization. This junior-level course builds upon the foundations of sustainable design principles and processes developed in previous courses by challenging students to further develop and apply their understanding of the environmental, social and economical impacts of resource use, design strategies and building technologies to a variety of design applications. Emphasis is on thinking critically about the interdependence of sustainability issues and strengthening problem-solving and communication skills through in-depth analysis of sustainable design procedures as they apply to high performance buildings using collaborative, research-based application of strategies and performance-based specifications, as well as a variety of third-party sustainable design rating systems. As part of the Sustainable Design Area of Specialization, coursework must be completed using the sustainable knowledge and strategies obtained to date. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to analyze and apply industry recognized sustainable design strategies and approaches using appropriate LEED and other green rating systems within residential and commercial design projects.

History of Architecture and Design - This course provides a survey of the history of the built environment based upon architecture and interiors from antiquity through the 21st century. Students investigate and document period design within the context of the cultural, sociological, and technological issues of each era including interior and exterior architectural elements, furniture, design motifs and ornamentation. Upon successful completion of the course, students have the ability to identify and evaluate the elements of architecture and interiors for each period studied, and apply those skills to period renovation, restoration, or to reinterpret historical design elements for current use. 
Along with teaching this on campus, I wrote the online content for the course. The culmination of the project included eight modules, corresponding imagery and presentation slide design, cited materials, media programming, exercise development and discussion board content.

Design Principles - Survey of Interior Design - This course is an introduction to the interior design profession and practice. The course introduces students to the principles, theories, and practices related to the interior environment and human behavior within a variety of contexts. Students learn terminology and fundamental skills related to interior design and architecture and apply that knowledge using a variety of communication methods and constructs. Upon successful completion of this course, students have a broad perspective awareness of the processes, practices, terminology, and basic skills necessary for continued study; and a foundation for the ethical approach to creating interior environments in the 21st century.

Residential Design -  This course examines the functional and aesthetic elements and considerations for residential environments within the context of current design philosophies, contemporary issues impacting housing and shelter, and best practices. Students investigate and apply design solutions for diverse client populations through projects that include appropriate space planning and spatial definition, furniture and finish selections, and presentation methods. Upon successful completion of this course, students have the ability to recognize, evaluate, apply and present different residential design alternatives using problem-solving strategies based on socio-cultural needs, contemporary issues for human function and behavior specifically for safe and supportive residential environments.

 

The Art Institute of Colorado, Denver, CO   
Adjunct Faculty, 2010 - 2012. Courses - Graduate Project Design Development Studio, Residential Studio, History of Design and Architecture II, Fundamentals of Drawing. 

Graduate Project :: Design Development Studio - I redeveloped this graduate design thesis studio. Students arrive having gone through the research and development phase, with a chosen program and site/building for their final graduation design project. Students develop their interior architectural design throughout the quarter with conceptual research, sketches, model making, drawing and multi-media explorations. Final deliverables include conceptual process investigations, plans, sections, elevations, site analysis, renderings and any other process related studies. In-class work, desk critiques, midterm critiques and final presentations in front of guest critics. 

Fundamentals of Drawing - Foundation class focused on drawing fundamentals. Students from different major areas of study. Students work with a variety of drawing techniques, methods and materials. Students learn a new technique each class and I work one-on-one with them to develop their drawing skills and promote their individual styles. Drawing assignments and in-class work collected throughout the quarter for grading and progress analysis. Final project assignment includes a mind map, conceptual explorations, sketching, preliminary drawings, final large format drawings and in-class presentations. 

Design Development :: Residential Studio - I redeveloped this studio focusing on the interior architecture of a single family housing unit in a local renovated industrial space. Students research the locale, demographics, site and history of the space to formulate their concept. They then explore the design process and define their project through conceptual research, sketches, model making, drawing and multi-media explorations. Final deliverables include conceptual process investigations, plans, sections, elevations, site analysis, renderings and any other process related studies. In-class work, desk critiques, midterm critiques and final presentations in front of guest critics. 

History of Design and Architecture II - Lecture class focusing on architecture, interiors and furniture (1835 - present). Students learn a variety of design styles and genres, and have to develop their projects consistent with the information being learned in class. Class consists of lectures, in-class assignments, homework, videos and exams. 

 

Haystack Mountain School of Arts and Crafts, Deer Isle, ME
Course - “Turn Me On” 2007

I co-taught this found object-based studio with Tucker Houlihan, RISD Professor and Furniture Designer.  Assisted students in the fabrication of found objects and gave design advice on creating a vocabulary, or narrative, with their pieces.  Worked with woodshop tools and small metal devices.  Assisted in electrical wiring of projects.  Final critique and presentations.  2007 

 

Rhode Island School of Design, Providence, RI
Teaching Assistant, 2003 - 2006
 
Courses - From Immaterial to Material, Human Factors, History of Interior Architecture. 

From Immaterial to Material - This course provides students with the skill to fully transform their 2D drafting skills into effective 3D forms. Through the use of large stationary machines, power tools, and hand tools, individuals will develop the ability to communicate their design skills into highly involved, tangible forms. Numerous hardware, fasteners, surface treatments, and finishes will be thoroughly covered throughout the semester.  2004, 2006

Human Factors - The psychology of the client/user are crucial factors influencing the design of the environment and the practice of interior architecture. This course explores issues of anthropometrics (the study of the characteristics of the human body), ergonomics (the application of anthropometric data to design), and proxemics (the study of the effect of cultural/psychological factors on design). During the semester the student will gather facts about the interaction of the environment and a user’s culture, gender, stage of life cycle, and physical characteristics. These ideas will be implemented in the design and construction of an object. 2003, 2005

History of Interior Architecture - This course examines the major designers working in the period 1850 to the present. Areas of study will include an examination of design related issues that will be studied in the context of their social, political, technological, and economic circumstances, as they pertain to the design culture of the period. Special emphasis will be given to the history of interior interventions, additions and renovations. Other areas of study will include the development of architectural drawing and other presentation media, and the way in which designs often evolved through committees, or ongoing consultations among the patrons, designers, administrators, and scholars. Attention will also be given to design theory, and the doctrines relating to site, orientation, proportion, decorum, and the commercial design market. A general background in the history of art and design is desirable but is not mandatory. 2004

 

Guest Critic Various Universities:

University of Colorado, Denver, CO   2010 - 2015
Participated in critiques for the Architecture Department’s MArch Studio 3. 
Participated in critiques for the Architecture Department’s Furniture Studio. 
Participated in critiques for the Architecture Department’s Design Studio 1. 
Participated in critiques for the Architecture Department’s Comprehensive Studio. 
Participated in critiques for the Architecture Department’s Archeological Dig Museum Studio.  

Rhode Island School of Design, Providence, RI   2009
Participated in critiques for the Architecture Department’s Nanotechnology Studio, Professor Peter Yeadon.

University of Oregon, Eugene, OR2008        
Participated in midterm critiques for the Interior Architecture Department’s Mixed-Use Studio.
*Short listed for tenure-track position: Assistant Professor of Interior Architecture.

Wentworth Institute of Technology, Boston MA  2005, 2007
Participated in the Department of Design & Facilities Urban Residence Adaptive Re-Use Project final critique. 
Participated in final critiques for the Department of Design Residential Design Studio.